Communicating “Normally” with People who have Disabilities

The following New York Times article gives many common-sense ideas about interacting with people who have disabilities. In reading it, I realized that very little is new. It just reminds us of the value of treating EVERYONE with dignity and respect. ____________________________________________________________________________________ https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/02/opinion/disabled-human-rights.html Continue reading Communicating “Normally” with People who have Disabilities

Sometimes “political correctness” just means seeing people for who they are.

The term, “politically correct” has taken quite a beating in recent years. The phrase can mean a lot of things, but these days it seems to be used in an insulting manner  – poking fun at people who are trying to be attentive to diversity in our society. Granted, there are situations where “political correctness” is overdone. (Examples might be describing a janitor as a … Continue reading Sometimes “political correctness” just means seeing people for who they are.

“Fear Itself”

Because Franklin D. Roosevelt had contracted polio, he was unable to use his legs. But he was counseled to hide this fact as much as possible, to keep him from appearing “weak.” In the book, “Roosevelt’s Splendid Deception,” Hugh Gallagher chronicles the extraordinary lengths that Roosevelt took to hide his disability from the world. He believed that this would cause him to be perceived as … Continue reading “Fear Itself”

When Talking to or about People with Disabilities, Words Matter.

This photo is pretty self-explanatory – it’s a begger with his cap in his hand. But a lot of people don’t know that this is where the term, “handicap” came from. This is a big part of the reason why that term is now disfavored. In addition, when you talk about a Black or Hispanic individual, you don’t usually mention their race first, if at … Continue reading When Talking to or about People with Disabilities, Words Matter.